Radiocarbon dating mistakes

So, we have a “clock” which starts ticking the moment something dies.Obviously, this works only for things which were once living.

This is only because it is well calibrated with objects of known age.

Offering in 1952 his new radiocarbon method for calculating the age of organic material (the time interval since the plant or the animal died), W. Libby clearly saw the limitations of the method and the conditions under which his theoretical figures would be valid: A.

Of the three reservoirs of radiocarbon on earththe atmosphere, the biosphere, and the hydrosphere, the richest is the lastthe oceans with the seas.

Suess explained the phenomenon by the fact that the increased industrial use of fossil carbon in coal and in oil changed the ratio between the dead carbon C12 and the C14 (radiocarbon) in the atmosphere and therefore also in the biosphere.

In centuries to come a body of a man or animal who lived and died in the 20th century would appear paradoxically of greater age since death than the body of a man or animal of the 19th century, and if the process of industrial use of fossil, therefore dead, carbon continues to increase, as it is expected will be the case, the paradox will continue into the forthcoming centuries.

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